Electromagnetic Fields: What the experts say

  • Electromagnetic Fields Committee of the Health Council of the Netherlands (SSM) / September 2014

     

    In a new review, the Electromagnetic Fields Committee of the Health Council of the Netherlands concludes that there are “no indications for cancer in experimental animals after exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields.”

    The Committee concludes from their review that “it is highly unlikely” that RF EMF can lead to cancer in animals. They recommend that no further animal studies on this topic be pursued until the results of the large-scale US National Toxicology Program research are known

    Further information:
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  • GSMA / Julio 2014

     

    In its report “LTE: Technology and Health”, the association representing mobile operators globally describes the main features of the LTE technology and addresses some of the questions about exposure to radio signals from LTE antennas and devices.

    According to GSMA, “based on the current state of scientific knowledge expert bodies consistently conclude that the international standards provide health protection for all persons and are relevant to all mobile technologies, including LTE”. And the association adds that new safe exposure limits are not necessary.

    Further information:

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  • Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) / June 2014

     

    In its annual Repor on EMF and Health, the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority from Sweden concludes: “New research does not suggest any health risks of using mobile phones or wireless computer networks.”

    Regarding the possible relation between mobile phone use and brain tumor development, says that for a period exceeding 15 years for children and teenagers, “the available literature to date does not indicate an increased risk.”

    Further information:

    > Source

    > Press release

     

  • Coureau et al., Occupational & Environment Medicine (France) / May 2014

     

    The CERENAT case-control study “Mobile phone use and brain tumours ” indicates that “no association with brain tumours was observed when comparing regular mobile phone users with non-users… However, the positive association was statistically significant in the heaviest users when considering life-long cumulative duration…and number of calls for gliomas…

    In relation to the last idea, GSMA comments that the study contained a very small number of brain tumours cases in the highest lifetime phone use category and the researchers said their results could have been influenced by recall bias.

    Further information:

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  • Royal Society of Canada / March 2014

     

    Experts from the Royal Society of Canada (RSC) following the revision of its standards (Code 6A) conclude in their report “the balance of evidence at this time does not indicate negative health effects from exposure to RF energy below the limits recommended in the Safety Code.”

    Further information:

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  • The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency / March 2014

     

    ARPANSA (The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency) has just published a bibliographic review of the effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. The scientific literature reviewed covers the period2002 to 2012.

    It concludes that “the current exposure limits in Australia, established by the ARPANSA in 2002 and in line with the ICNIRP, continue to provide a high degree of protection against known health effects.” However, the ARPANSA says that there have been many scientific advances since 2002 and these are not reflected in the ICNIRP limits, therefore, the agency considers that they should be updated (which does not mean that they should be changed) to include all of the current scientific reviews. These scientific advances, for example, do not invalidate the Basic Restrictions1 but they do question the Reference Levels2 of the exposure limits. To justify this, they add that dosimetry studies have advanced significantly and this is not reflected in the 2002 limits. Finally, it adds a precautionary message with respect to cases in which there is uncertainty about the total safety related to occupational exposure.

    1Basic restrictions: levels of exposure to electromagnetic fields for which thermal effects can be observed in people. They are expressed in terms of the density of the current in the head and torso and of the SAR throughout the body and localised SAR (limbs).

    2Reference levels: the levels, in terms of the intensity of the electric field, the intensity of the magnetic field and the density of the power, used to take experimental measurements and check that they meet the basic restrictions.

    Complying with the reference levels ensures compliance with the basic restrictions, but the contrary is not true: exceeding these levels does not mean that the basic restrictions are not met.

    Further information:

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  • Spain´s Scientific Advisory Committee on Radio Frequencies (CCARS) / March 2014

     

    In its biennial report, the CCARS has published that epidemiological and clinical studies continue to provide the most information through reports and analyses supplied by different international committees and agencies. The data continues to support the argument that there is no evidence of a causal relationship between exposure to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) and the appearance of tumours. There is general consensus – a position that the CCARS shares – that research into the basic mechanisms should be encouraged.

    In situations of alarm, it recommends that the relevant authorities react quickly, providing objective, comprehensible, transparent and independent information. It also recommendsdefining R&D&i plans based on the effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields that allow interaction mechanisms to be established between these electromagnetic fields and biological systems as well as increasing knowledge about the causes and symptoms of electromagnetic hypersensitivity syndrome.

    Further information:

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  • The UK’s Mobile Telecommunications Health Research Programme (MTHR) / February 2014

    After 11 years of research about the possible effects of exposure to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) from mobile phones on health, the Mobile Telecommunications Health Research Programme (MTHR) in the UK has published its final report. The main conclusion is thatthere is no evidence of biological or adverse health effects.

    This report responds to one of the recommendations of the UK’s Independent Expert Group in 2001 (Stewart Report). The project was jointly funded by the government and industry, with total funding of £13.6 million. Over these years, it has produced more than 50 scientific publications, which are listed in the report

    Further information:

    Report

     

  • The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) / Enero 2014

     

    The RF electromagnetic energy transmitted in a single pulse from the smart meter is similar to that from a car remote unlocking fob and much less than a single GSM SMS transmission. The measurements do not provide any indication of why smart meter transmissions would provoke symptoms in people otherwise unaffected by other wireless technologies such as mobile phone handsets. Indeed the low levels and short transmission times make any effects highly unlik

    Further information:

    Report

     

  • Nordic radiation safety authorities on RF EMFs / January 2014

     

    The Nordic authorities Nordic Radiation Safety Authorities. Sundhedsstyrelsen (Danish Health and Medicines Authority), STUK (Finland), Strålsäkerhetsmyndigheten (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority), Statens strålevern (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority), and Geislavarnir Ríkisins (Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority. BAFU) have published a joint statement on the safety of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from mobile phones, base stations and wireless networks. The main conclusions are: “A review of all the scientific studies published to date does not reveal that there are adverse health effects from exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields below the limits adopted in the Nordic countries. However, there are few epidemiological studies on long-term exposure to radio waves from mobile phones, especially studies on children and adolescents.” They recommend reducing exposure by using a hands-free device, sending text messages and speaking in areas with good coverage.

    Further information:

    Report

     

 

Scientists do not establish health risks from electromagnetic fields